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121. Common, The: A gently sloping lawn and favorite gathering place in the newer section of the Sesquicentennial Park.  
122. Houston's Heart: A nickname for the Allen's Landing area, the place where August C. and John K. Allen stepped ashore in 1836 and st...  
123. Guadalupe Plaza: A park in the East End of Houston that celebrated the city's Hispanic culture and traditions.  
124. Hidalgo Park: A cultural center in the East End area, founded in 1927 and later purchased by neighborhood residents and revitaliz...  
125. Hippie Hollow: A county park situated along Lake Travis, is the only clothing-optional public park in Texas.  
126. Austin Ballet: Located in the heart of downtown Austin, it is one of the largest ballets in the country.  
127. Austin American Statesmen: Austin's most widely distributed and read daily newspaper.  
128. Austin Chronicle: An alternative weekly, tabloid-style newspaper published every Thursday in Austin.  
129. Esther's Folloes: Vaudeville theater located on 6th Street in downtown Austin.  
130. Longhorns: The University of Texas' famous mascot and team name.  
131. Congress Avenue Bridge: Running over the Colorado River, it is home to the world's largest urban bat colony.  
132. Blanton Museum of Art: The art museum and research center of the University of Texas at Austin.  
133. Texas State Capitol: The seat of the Texas government located in the center of Austin, it was the center of a Supreme Court controversy ...  
134. Pecan Street Festival: Common name for the Old Pecan Street Spring and Fall Arts Festival, a bi-annual public event held every spring and ...  
135. Austin Zoo: Non-profit rescue zoo and animal sactuary located in Austin, TX.  
 
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Although it sounds like something made up by a seventh-grade boy, "Show and Blow" is the official name of the new alcohol-related policy for the student section at Wisconsin Badger football games. A student who is ejected for alcohol-related reasons must come to each subsequent game sober if underage or legally sober if of age. Apparently this policy was implemented last year (2007) but I only learned of it this year when the Dean of Students sent a letter to all season ticket holders that explains some changes to the Show and Blow program. Now, after a student is ejected, his or her ticket will be electronically tagged. In subsequent games the holder of that tagged voucher (NOT the person who was previously ejected) will be ushered to a Show and Blow area upon entering the stadium. This has implications for the student ticket resale market, as the electronic tag will be tied to all the vouchers in the season ticket packet in question, and not the offending person at the game.

Tyme is money, as the old Tyme slogan went...

1. ATMs in southern Wisconsin used to run under the brand Take Your Money Everywhere or TYME. The iconic machines were known as Tyme Machines instead of ATMs. They were notorious for "closing" with a sliding iron door coming down just when one needed to make a withdrawal. Visitors likely believed the worst of Madison's detractors when locals asked "Is the Tyme machine open?"

2. This is Madison speak for ATM. Many newcomers are puzzled when an old-school Wisconsinite asks them for a "Tyme machine."

3. It wasn't just southern wisconsin, it was most of if not all of the state. Before there were debit cards, there were Tyme cards!

4. The first ATMs were brought to Milwaukee through the M&I Bank. The president of M&I at the time was Dennis Keuster. He had the foresight to see that this would revolutionize banking.

Hazy, hot, and humid -- how local news anchors describe a typical summer day in D.C.

A group of people who follow a brass band down the street while swinging handkerchiefs over their heads and doing a special, shuffle-step dance.

Retrocession is the act of giving back land that was once granted. In the case of Washington, DC retrocession is the process of returning land to Virginia and Maryland after the creation of the federal District of Columbia in 1791 for our nation's capital.