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121. Common, The: A gently sloping lawn and favorite gathering place in the newer section of the Sesquicentennial Park.  
122. Houston's Heart: A nickname for the Allen's Landing area, the place where August C. and John K. Allen stepped ashore in 1836 and st...  
123. Guadalupe Plaza: A park in the East End of Houston that celebrated the city's Hispanic culture and traditions.  
124. Hidalgo Park: A cultural center in the East End area, founded in 1927 and later purchased by neighborhood residents and revitaliz...  
125. Hippie Hollow: A county park situated along Lake Travis, is the only clothing-optional public park in Texas.  
126. Austin Ballet: Located in the heart of downtown Austin, it is one of the largest ballets in the country.  
127. Austin American Statesmen: Austin's most widely distributed and read daily newspaper.  
128. Austin Chronicle: An alternative weekly, tabloid-style newspaper published every Thursday in Austin.  
129. Esther's Folloes: Vaudeville theater located on 6th Street in downtown Austin.  
130. Longhorns: The University of Texas' famous mascot and team name.  
131. Congress Avenue Bridge: Running over the Colorado River, it is home to the world's largest urban bat colony.  
132. Blanton Museum of Art: The art museum and research center of the University of Texas at Austin.  
133. Texas State Capitol: The seat of the Texas government located in the center of Austin, it was the center of a Supreme Court controversy ...  
134. Pecan Street Festival: Common name for the Old Pecan Street Spring and Fall Arts Festival, a bi-annual public event held every spring and ...  
135. Austin Zoo: Non-profit rescue zoo and animal sactuary located in Austin, TX.  
 
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Satan's Steed is one of the nicknames of the blue horse sculpture just outside of the Denver International Airport. The horse's creepy red eyes attract all sorts of disgust from the Colorado public, who lament the fact that the sculpture is placed so prominently at the gateway to the city. Adding to the mustang's mystique, scupltor Luis Jimenez died...

1. The Japanese cherry tree that makes the National Cherry Blossom Festival possible. The festival first started in 1934 to commemorate the mayor of Tokyo's gift of 3,000 sakuras to the city of Washington, D.C. The number of trees has since grown to over 6,000.

2. Japanese cherry tree.

1. Flip-flops. Origin: the Spanish word "chancletas", meaning sandals.

2. Flip-flops

Theodore Roosevelt was shot in front of Milwaukee's Gilpatrick Hotel in 1912. The then presidential nominee for the Progressive Party was shot in the chest, but went on to deliver his speech later that day because the bullet was slowed down by a glass case and a manuscript. They don't make'em like they used to!

1. A very unique term to New Orleans for the median of a street. The Spanish and French, who inhabited the older part of town, could do business on the "neutral" part of Canal Street with the Americans, who inhabited the newer part of town that started on the other side of the street. By extension, all strips of land in the middle of New Orleans streets have become "neutral ground".

2. A part of Western Louisiana that was temporarily made neutral after the Louisiana Purchase. Texas (Spanish) and the United States laid claim to the strip of land, but ended up tabling the issue until later. It is also know as Sabine Free State.

3. Neutral Ground Coffeehouse is New Orleans' oldest coffeehouse, surviving a kitchen fire and Hurricane Katrina over the years. It started out as the Penny Post, but later was called Neutral Ground.

4. Also the name of a coffee shop on Danneel Street.