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Past Words of the Day

1. Granolaville is a nickname for Madison's Marquette neighborhood, which is well known for its bustling activity along Williamson (Willy) Street. In Granolaville you'll find great restaurants, bars, and--oh yeah--lots of hippies.

2. Slang for the Williamson Street (popularly dubbed "Willy Street") area, a very hippy-like neighborhood with a great food co-op and trendy hipster bars.

Trustafarian is the portmanteau of the words "trust fund" and "Rastafarian". A trustafarian is typically an upper-middle-class white kid who attends school at Boulder who is wholly funded by his parents (whose fortunes are usually amassed through giant corporations) and talks of the evils of capitalism.

The top of the hill.

1. The annual Crazylegs Classic is an 8k (roughly 5 mile) run or a 2 mile walk. It starts on the Capitol Square and end on the field at Camp Randall Stadium. It started in 1982 and has grown to a race of almost 15,000 by 2007. The race has received national recognition as America's Best 100 Events in Runner's World Magazine. I can personally attest that this is a very fun event. They even have beer for you after you run! 2008 Update: The race this year was quite cold. The temp was in the forties but the 30mph wind made it seem colder. However, the cold didn't seem to hurt the attendance as it was a new record at over 17,000.

2. A great tradition in Madison that got better with the addition of wave starts. It used to be a two mile walk followed by a three mile run after you passed all the people that started way ahead of their actual mile pace. One can actually run the entire race now. A little pricey for just a tshirt but I guess you do get beer at the end and the money goes to a good cause. THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT. Gotta support those non rev sports.

Fargo is one of the many US cities to claim to be the Gateway to the West, a luxury apparently afforded to any town east of the West.

Bauble, trinket. Usually used when describing the items tourists buy in Times Square to remind them of their trip to NYC. Also known as schlock or kitsch.