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61. Yinzer: Someone with a strong Pittsburgh accent  
62. Three Mile Island: The meltdown at Three Mile Island nuclear power plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania, on March 28, 1979, was the mos...
63. Provolone Wit: A cheesesteak with Provolone cheese and onions.  
64. Pittsburgh Left: (noun) Traffic light maneuver associated with Pittsburgh. It is when a the first car in either direction waiting fo...  
65. Independence Hall: Place where the Declaration of Independence was read to the public and debated. It also was the original home of t...  
66. Philadelphia Eagles: Official name for the National Football League team in Philadelphia, PA. Part of the National Football Conference ...  
67. Pittsburgh Steelers: Other pronounciations, "Stillers"  
68. Center City: The downtown area of Philadelphia  
69. Old City: Philly's oldest neighborhood, the area featuring the Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, and many other historical lan...  
70. South Philly: A nickname for South Philadelphia, the area featuring the city's professional sports complex, famous cheese steak p...  
71. West Philly: A nickname for the section of Philadelphia west of the Schuylkill River, sometimes referred to as "University City"...  
72. Liberty Bell: The famous, 2000-pound bronze bell with the signature crack is on public display at the Liberty Bell Center on Mark...
73. City Pidgeon: A version of City Chicken (which is a skewered concoction of veal and pork unique to Pittsburgh)made with cheaper i...  
74. Parkway, The: A commonly used local reference to the Penn-Lincoln Parkway.  
75. Civic Arena, The: Now officially but not commonly called the Carnegie Mellon Arena and home to the Pittsburgh Penguins hockey team.  
 
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Past Words of the Day

Pochismo is a type of "Spanglish" spoken in Miami. In Miami, most of the Spanish influence in pochismo comes from Cuban culture.

An act first practiced at Brookfield Central High School in the mid-1990s. Several students from the Milwaukee suburb of Brookfield, being of a gentle disposition, sought a safer and more sanitary form of humiliation than the traditional swirlie, which involves holding someone's head in a toilet and then flushing. The new "Brookfield swirlie" consisted of holding the victim's head down on the surface of a water fountain (a water fountain of course being known as a "bubbler" to some but not all Wisconsinites) so that the fountain water shoots into the ear of the victim. In this era at Brookfield Central, a few girls practiced this more genteel "swirlie" (boys are far more likely than girls to practice the more dangerous traditional swirlie). Nevertheless, an undesired side-effect of the Brookfield swirlie was that the act was more public and in some ways riskier than the traditional toilet-based variety.

The technical definition is an adjective used to describe something as cheap or inferior. New Yorkers use it as a term encompassing all of the souvenirs sold in Times Square that tourists take home with them to remind them of their trip to New York City. (I mean, what else would you call a melamine ash tray shaped like a yellow taxi?) AKA kitsch. Individual items of schlock or kitsch are known as tchotchkes.

A very unique term to New Orleans for the median of a street. The Spanish and French, who effectively split the city in two, could do business on the "neutral ground" of city streets.

The "Gum Wall" is just that, a wall of a building with chewed gum stuck to it. It's an odd landmark found at the famous Pike Place Market.