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1. Penntrification: Refers to the gentrifying effect of the University of Pennsylvania on the West Philadelphia area.  
2. N'at: Slang for "and that". There are even pizza places called "Pizza N'At"  
3. Anymore: As used in Pittsburgh, the word means "lately" or "currently" as in "The gas prices are outrageous anymore."  
4. City Chicken: A skewered concoction of veal and pork unique to Pittsburgh.  
5. Whiz Wit: A cheesesteak with Cheese Whiz and onions.  
6. Coffee Regular: Coffee with cream and sugar.  
7. Jawn: Thing  
8. Philly Cheese Steak: The famous Philadelphia sandwich, a long roll stuffed with thinly sliced steak and dripping with melted cheese.  
9. Crick: Creek, river, stream, etc.  
10. Denver Boot: A device attached to the wheel of a car by Pittsburgh Police in order to immobilize the vehicle and aid in the enfo...  
11. Get a bath: To bathe or shower.  
12. Gum Bands: This slang for rubber bands in Pittsburgh speak, not to be confused with bubble gum bands, which are singing groups...  
13. Buggy: A supermarket shopping cart.
14. East Carson Street: A funky neighborhood in South Side Pittsburgh that features bars, tattoo shops and eclectic shopping.  
15. Oakland: One of the "surrounding Pittsburgh" neighborhoods and home to the University of Pittsburgh.  
 
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Past Words of the Day

The technical definition is an adjective used to describe something as cheap or inferior. New Yorkers use it as a term encompassing all of the souvenirs sold in Times Square that tourists take home with them to remind them of their trip to New York City. (I mean, what else would you call a melamine ash tray shaped like a yellow taxi?) AKA kitsch. Individual items of schlock or kitsch are known as tchotchkes.

1. An adjective used to describe something that is Wisconsin-like, or a noun that simply means Wisconsinite. Wisconsinites are often called "Sconnies" outside of the state. The word is now gaining traction within Wisconsin as well, largely the result of the company "Sconnie Nation" that was founded by two UW-Madison students in their Lakeshore dorm room.

2. I beg to differ: my friends and I were using the term "Sconnie" during college in Madison in the 80's. I first heard it from a good friend who hailed from Oshkosh. He now lives in Seattle, and we bought some of the original Sconnie Nation sweatshirts several years ago and had a reunion, specifically to mourn the fact the WE didn't copyright the term. The Sconnie Nation owners can confirm this.

3. Although many naysayers are correct in saying that "Sconnie" is not a term often used by real Wisconsinites, it is certainly a legitimate term, as it is used in other states in reference to Wisconsinites. In Michigan, a Sconnie is someone from Wisconsin.

4. A bogus term made up to sell t-shirts. True Wisconsinites will confirm that no one from Wisconsin uses this term to refer to each other.

Common phrase that you learn and laugh at in elementary school in WC. Refers to the fact that you can go into town via High Street, then hang a right on Gay Street and exit town to the east side.

Means "you should believe me when I say this". May be used at the beginning or end of a sentence. Ex: "Believe you me, Peter, they are up to no good."

Original nickname for the Syracuse University sports teams. No, it has nothing to do with crackers, but rather Syracuse's prominence in the salt trade. The Saltine Warriors then became the Orangemen, and then the more gender-neutral Orange.