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1. Oklahoma City National Memorial & Museum: Located at the former site of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City, the Oklahoma City National Me...  
2. Oil Capital of the World: A popular nickname for Tulsa until recent decades when Houston overtook Tulsa as the top spot in the US oil industr...  
3. Birthplace of Route 66: Who was he? What actions did ge take? Springfield, mo is the birthplace.
4. 405, The: Oklahoma City, OK  
5. OKC: Shorthand for Oklahoma City  
 
 
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1. The hodag is the official mascot of the Rhinelander area. The mythical beast is the the local high school's mascot. The University of Wisconsin-Madison's ultimate frisbee team has followed suit. They're called the Wisconsin Hodags.

2. The mascot for the Rhinelander area, the hodag is a mythical creature that resembles a large horned lizard-like beast.

Bon Appetit and GQ magazine's 2007 "Chef of the Year," David Chang is New York City's most talked-about chef at the moment with three restaurants in the East Village - Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssam Bar, and Momofuku Ko. As Frank Bruni (New York Times restaurant critic) put it: "David Chang is at this point the New York restaurant world’s equivalent of Tiger Woods or Roger Federer, armed with a spatula in place of a nine-iron or tennis racket. He’s marveled at and clucked over like nobody’s business. He’s it."

Nickname for Portland because of all the rainfall it receives. Puddletown has made its way into popular PDX culture, as it's commonly affixed to names of businesses, sports teams, et al.

For some reason, low-numbered license plates have become a status symbol in Rhode Island, to the point of a rash of illegal auctions taking place for these prestigious items.

Sliding down snow or ice covered hills on "borrowed" cafeteria trays used as makeshift sleds or saucers, mostly by UW students, and particularly on the hill toward the lake from Observatory Drive near Elizabeth Waters Residence Hall (dorm), and less often down Bascom Hill or elsewhere around campus.