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North Dakota Taglines

  1. To boldly go where no man has gone before
  2. In North Dakota no one can hear you scream
  3. To boldly go where few have gone before
 
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Past Words of the Day

This is August 15 and a few days on either side. When all the leases in the central city turn over at the same time, many students and other renters leave vast piles of unwanted belongings on the curb as they change apartments. These items are often taken home by others as the population garbage picks the piles. When someone asks where you got an item, you reply "Hippie Christmas."

The collective term for the New Orleans Saints fans, taken from the famous "Who Dat?" chant.

1. An adjective used to describe something that is Wisconsin-like, or a noun that simply means Wisconsinite. Wisconsinites are often called "Sconnies" outside of the state. The word is now gaining traction within Wisconsin as well, largely the result of the company "Sconnie Nation" that was founded by two UW-Madison students in their Lakeshore dorm room.

2. I beg to differ: my friends and I were using the term "Sconnie" during college in Madison in the 80's. I first heard it from a good friend who hailed from Oshkosh. He now lives in Seattle, and we bought some of the original Sconnie Nation sweatshirts several years ago and had a reunion, specifically to mourn the fact the WE didn't copyright the term. The Sconnie Nation owners can confirm this.

3. Although many naysayers are correct in saying that "Sconnie" is not a term often used by real Wisconsinites, it is certainly a legitimate term, as it is used in other states in reference to Wisconsinites. In Michigan, a Sconnie is someone from Wisconsin.

4. A bogus term made up to sell t-shirts. True Wisconsinites will confirm that no one from Wisconsin uses this term to refer to each other.

Reference to the CTA trains, which run elevated from the streets.

Nickname for the city's award-winning daily newspaper, the Providence Journal. This paper holds the distinction of being the oldest continuously published daily in the U.S., having been started in 1829.