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Top Massachusetts Entries

1. 30 Rack: A case of beer.  
2. Down Cella: In the basement.  
3. Clicka: Remote Control.  
4. Durgan Park: The Boston Bar & Club Directory. Search 337 Current and Accurate Listings. Exclusive information and images.  
5. Packie Run: A trip to the liquor store.  
6. Jimmies: Bostonian for 'sprinkles', the type used to garnish ice cream cones.  
7. Troopahs: Troopers, police officers.  
8. Baahston: Local pronunciation of "Boston".  
9. Elastics: Rubber Bands.  
10. Bubblah: A drinking fountain, or bubbler if you will.  
11. Take a U-ey: You can also bang a u-ey.  
12. Ya beddanot: You'd better not do that.  
13. Dunkies: Dunkin Donuts  
14. Bang a left: Take a left (while driving).  
15. Wicked: 3. Could also be used for "really" Ex: Baahston to Prahvidence is fah, but it's nahwt wicked fah.  
 
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1. Mt. Horeble, or Mt. Horrible, is a derogatory name for the town, often invoked by local high schoolers to describe Mt. Horeb's alleged lackluster assets or traditional, closed mindset

2. I've lived in Mt. Horeb and I've never heard this nickname.

3. A playfully derogatory nickname for Mount Horeb.

1. "Smurf Turf" is a common nickname for Bronco Stadium at Boise State University. It is the only blue astro-turf field in the nation.

2. Boise State is no longer the only collegiate football team to play on a blue field. The University of New...

1. This isn't actually Spanish, and isn't pronounced as such. It's actually an old Southern word for laundromat and it's pronounced "wash-uh-TEER-ee-uh", more like how you'd say the English "cafeteria", and not in some Latin way.

2. Another name for a laundromat, taken from Houston's rich "Spanglish" vernacular.

Forbes Magazine bestowed this honor upon the Mile-High city in light of its record breaking contraceptive sales.

This is how a New Yorker might say "orange".