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1. Treme: Named after Claude Treme, the Treme (pronounced truh-MAY) neighborhood (often referred to simply as 'Treme') is the...
2. Mid-City: Mid-City is one of the largest of New Orleans' 73 neighborhoods, and one of its most diverse. The neighborhood ext...  
3. Neutral Ground: A very unique term to New Orleans for the median of a street. The Spanish and French, who inhabited the older part ...  
4. CP3: CP3 is also the nickname of the Calliope Projects (CP), which is in the 3rd Ward.  
5. Coffee & Chicory: Coffee laced with chicory. Rumored to have originated in New Orleans during the Civil War, when the city was under...  
6. New Orleanian: This is, or so I have been told, the term to apply to those that have been born and/or lived in New Orleans.  
7. Dixie Brewing Company: A specialty brewer in New Orleans that started shortly after the turn of the 20th Century. Unfortunately, the facil...  
8. Who Dat Nation: The collective term for the New Orleans Saints fans, taken from the famous "Who Dat?" chant.  
9. Geaux: A Cajun American play on the word "go", which derives its orthography from French influence in the area. You'll oft...  
10. French Quarter: The oldest neighborhood in New Orleans, and the only section of the city where streets run in a grid and a nexus fo...  
11. Po' Boy: A New Orleans hero-type sandwich made with French bread and a variety of fillings.  
12. Streetcar: Trolley, electric street railway car.  
13. Garden District: An area of architecturally impressive mansions and Victorian-era houses, a favorite place for walking tours.  
14. Big Easy, The: Nickname for New Orleans as a contrast with the "Big Apple" because of New Orleans' relatively easygoing pace of li...  
15. Crescent City: A nickname for New Orleans.  
 
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1. The colored (orange, yellow and green) metal chairs outside at the Memorial Union Terrace. You can buy replica terrace chairs in the store inside the union in red and white, but not in the colors outside (though students have been known to steal the real ones as college souvenirs to remember happy times drinking and socializing on the terrace). People have gotten "busted" for having them out on porches and balconies where their thievery is on display.

2. For me, the chairs represent the center of the Universe. I have traveled all over the world and have met people who know the chairs. Just this last weekend I introduced my 8 year old to the chairs. We relaxed in them and enjoyed a cool beverage while watching the boats on the lake and listening to reggae.

3. The terrace chairs represent some of my fondest memories at UW. I spent many a day sitting in them, looking out over the lake and pretending to study. The terrace chairs are quintessentially Madison.

4. Sure, the terrace chairs are emblematic of UW-Madison, and perhaps Madison as a whole, but nobody ever assesses their comfort. I find them quite uncomfortable.

Citywide catastrophe rumored to have been started by the "O'Leary cow." As legend goes, the O'Leary cow kicked over a lantern in the O'Leary farm which started to spread throughout the city. Every building in the city, which was made out of wood then, was either damaged or destroyed with the exception of the Water Tower which stands to this day.

A baked casserole dish that is commonly eaten in Minnesota homes. Popular varieties include Tator Tot hotdish, Party Potatoes (aka Funeral Potatoes), Green Bean casserole and Wild Rice casserole. Many of these are cooked with Campbell's Soup such as Cream of Chicken.

A very unique term to New Orleans for the median of a street. The Spanish and French, who effectively split the city in two, could do business on the "neutral ground" of city streets.

Provel cheese is most commonly found on "St. Louis style" pizza. It is a combination of cheddar, swiss and provolone cheeses. Provel was originally invented in St. Louis in 1947 by Costa Grocery (now known as Roma Grocery on the Hill) and the Hoffman Dairy of Wisconsin. Their goal was to create a cheese that melted, but didn't leave strings when you took a bite.