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61. HealthFirst Family Medical Clinic: Dermal Fillers, Skin Lesion Removals, Family Doctor, Primary Care Physician, Botox, Juvederm, Skin Care Clinic, DOT...
62. Shop Today 2 Smoke Shop: Smoke Shop, Tobacco, Tobacco Shop, Vapes, Vape Juice, Hookah, Glass Pipes, Tobacco Accessories , Vape Shop, E Cigar...
63. Kelley Fire Protection Inc: Automatic Fire Sprinkler Contractor, Fire Sprinkler, Fire Protection, Fire Sprinkler Installation, Fire Sprinkler C...
64. Natural Mystic: Gift Shop, Vape Products, Hand Blown Glass, Kratom, Vaporizers, Vape Shop, Tapestries, Crystals, Water Pipes, Glas...
65. Raymond James: Cornerstone Retirement Advisors, Inc.: Financial Planning, Financial Services, Asset Management, Stocks and Bonds, 401k, Investment Solutions, Retirement ...  
66. Raymond James: Cornerstone Retirement Advisors, Inc.: Financial Planning, Financial Services, Asset Management, Stocks and Bonds, 401k, Investment Solutions, Retirement ...  
 
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Kentucky Tagline
"Home of fried chicken and personal lubricant" Edit | History
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Trustafarian is the portmanteau of the words "trust fund" and "Rastafarian". A trustafarian is typically an upper-middle-class white kid who attends school at Boulder who is wholly funded by his parents (whose fortunes are usually amassed through giant corporations) and talks of the evils of capitalism.

In the basement.

Nickname for the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh (or some claim the entire city of Oshkosh) referring to their heavy drinking reputation.

Dubbed "Touchdown Jesus" by Notre Dame alumni, "The Word of Life," constructed by Millard Sheets, is a mural on the face of the university's Hesburgh Library. Easily viewed from the football stadium, the piece features the looming figure of the resurrected Jesus with arms raised like a referee signaling a touchdown.

1. Hafa Adai (pronounced "half a day") is "hello" in Guam's native Chamorro language. It's used more or less the same way as "aloha" is used as a greeting on the Hawaiian Islands.

2. Can also be close to "what's up" in its meaning. Just "hafa" is often used, but it's the informal usage.