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136. St Patrick's Day Parade: Savannah's St. Patrick's Day parade is the second largest in the country, and the grand event is organized all by v...  
137. Live Oaks Library: One of Savannah's comprehensive public libraries. Periodically, they hold book sales, but the Bull St branch also h...  
138. Clary's Cafe: A cute little eatery that has been around since the early 1900s. It was originally an old-style pharmacy with a lun...  
139. Vinnie Van Go-Go's: Locals will tell you that Vinnie's has the best pizza in Savannah; New York style Neopolitan with fresh dough made ...  
140. Cafe Gelatohhh!!!: You can score the most heavenly Italian gelato at this little ice cream shop in the historic City Market; many auth...  
141. Wall's Barbecue: A little shack of a restaurant set back into an alley in the historic area of the city, but don't let the modest de...
142. Gryphon Tea Room: A well-known and quite lovely tea room in the historic district, built into an old pharmacy. They offer hundreds of...  
143. Ponce: The full name of the street is Ponce de Leon, but the official pronunciation is anything but Spanish. The Atlanta ...  
144. Maynard Jackson: Atlanta's first black mayor, elected in 1973.  
145. Grady Curve: A stretch of the Interstate 75/85 highway that curves around the heart of downtown Atlanta going north and south. ...  
146. Georgia State University (GSU): Public University located in downtown Atlanta. Website states that "with more than 40,000 students seeking degrees...  
147. Pounce: Georgia State University's mascot. A panther.  
148. Carl Patton: President of Georgia State University (1992 through 2008).  
149. Earl, The: Bar and music venue in East Atlanta.  
150. 5 Seasons Brewing: Brewpub in Atlanta with a few locations.  
 
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The oldest coffeehouse in New Orleans, famous for beignets and chicory-laced coffee.

In January 1996, a blizzard hit and shut down NYC. Hundreds of stranded travelers were forced to live in the terminals of JFK Airport for two days, since even buses and taxis were immobilized.

Leftover tomato pie from Palermos (half fried eggplant, half garlic).

Trenton's unique vision of a pizza pie, light on the cheese and heavy with big chunks of tomato drizzled with olive oil.


Rappers will sometimes call Ft. Myers "Lil Pakistan" because of its relatively high crime rate. Although Pakistan's crime rate is low compared to industrialized countries, people in the US often get the impression that Pakistan is war-torn and crime-ridden, in all places at all times.

1. Named after Claude Treme, the Treme (pronounced truh-MAY) neighborhood (often referred to simply as 'Treme') is the first free neighborhood of color in America. Treme is the location of Congo Square, where African folkways and music were permitted to flourish long before slaves were able to freely congregate anywhere else in the country. Treme is also the site of Storeyville, and is as close to any one place in New Orleans as can be considered the actual birthplace of jazz. Claiborne Avenue, which forms the northern border of Treme, was once the wealthiest African-American commercial district in the US, until I-10 was constructed in 1966. Today, Treme is still home to beautiful creole architecture, vibrant restaurants (like Dooky Chase, Lil Dizzy's, and Willie Mae's Scotch House), and live oaks. Louis Armstrong National Jazz Park is located in Treme, as is the Mahalia Jackson Theater of Performing Arts.

2. Treme is also the name of an HBO series to come out in 2010 about the neighborhood's ongoing rebuilding efforts after Hurricane Katrina. The series was created by David Simon, who also created the hit series "The Wire".