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61. Congri: Rice and beans cooked together.  
62. Maduros: Fried plantains  
63. Paella: Seafood and rice dish.  
64. Cafecito: Cuban coffee  
65. Coconut Grove Arts Festival: One of the nation's premier outdoor arts festivals occurs in February in the Coconut Grove area.  
66. Casa Casaurina: 1114 Ocean Drive, the three-story Spanish-Mediterranean palace and former home of the late Gianni Versace.  
67. Temple Emanu El Synagogue: A large Temple at the intersection of Washington Ave. and 17th Street in the South Beach area of Miami.  
68. Miami Beach Convention Center: This large convention center often hosts huge car and boat shows.  
69. Eden Roc: The Eden Roc Hotel and Resort at 4525 Collins Ave, a notable 1950s-era resort.  
70. Hurricane Season: June-November, officially.  
71. Graves Museum: Graves Museum of Archeology and Natural History in Dania, Florida.  
72. Nation's Bank Tower: A neon-lit highlight of the Miami skyline.  
73. Miami River: The river that flows through downtown Miami from the Everglades into the Port of Miami.  
74. Birckell Ave Bridge: Crosses the Miami River.  
75. Biscayune Bay: A 35-mile long lagoon, part of which forms the boundary between the Miami and Miami Beach areas.  
 
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Past Words of the Day

A nickname originally given to the Elmira Civil War Prison Camp by its Confederate prisoners. Hellmira can still be used as a derogatory term for the city of Elmira itself.

A nickname for the Dinkytown area that is earned by the many rowdy college kids that live in the neighborhood.

Punxsatawney Phil is actually Pennsylvania's version of Jimmy the Groundhog. After all, Sun Prairie is the Groundhog Capital of the World.

Keep Austin Weird was a slogan initiated by the Austin Small Business Alliance to help promote the city and its local businesses. Local street character Leslie Cochran didn't come up with the phrase, but...

1. Named after Claude Treme, the Treme (pronounced truh-MAY) neighborhood (often referred to simply as 'Treme') is the first free neighborhood of color in America. Treme is the location of Congo Square, where African folkways and music were permitted to flourish long before slaves were able to freely congregate anywhere else in the country. Treme is also the site of Storeyville, and is as close to any one place in New Orleans as can be considered the actual birthplace of jazz. Claiborne Avenue, which forms the northern border of Treme, was once the wealthiest African-American commercial district in the US, until I-10 was constructed in 1966. Today, Treme is still home to beautiful creole architecture, vibrant restaurants (like Dooky Chase, Lil Dizzy's, and Willie Mae's Scotch House), and live oaks. Louis Armstrong National Jazz Park is located in Treme, as is the Mahalia Jackson Theater of Performing Arts.

2. Treme is also the name of an HBO series to come out in 2010 about the neighborhood's ongoing rebuilding efforts after Hurricane Katrina. The series was created by David Simon, who also created the hit series "The Wire".