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61. Congri: Rice and beans cooked together.  
62. Maduros: Fried plantains  
63. Paella: Seafood and rice dish.  
64. Cafecito: Cuban coffee  
65. Coconut Grove Arts Festival: One of the nation's premier outdoor arts festivals occurs in February in the Coconut Grove area.  
66. Casa Casaurina: 1114 Ocean Drive, the three-story Spanish-Mediterranean palace and former home of the late Gianni Versace.  
67. Temple Emanu El Synagogue: A large Temple at the intersection of Washington Ave. and 17th Street in the South Beach area of Miami.  
68. Miami Beach Convention Center: This large convention center often hosts huge car and boat shows.  
69. Eden Roc: The Eden Roc Hotel and Resort at 4525 Collins Ave, a notable 1950s-era resort.  
70. Hurricane Season: June-November, officially.  
71. Graves Museum: Graves Museum of Archeology and Natural History in Dania, Florida.  
72. Nation's Bank Tower: A neon-lit highlight of the Miami skyline.  
73. Miami River: The river that flows through downtown Miami from the Everglades into the Port of Miami.  
74. Birckell Ave Bridge: Crosses the Miami River.  
75. Biscayune Bay: A 35-mile long lagoon, part of which forms the boundary between the Miami and Miami Beach areas.  
 
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The Bankhead Bounce is a dance that originated in the Bankhead neighborhood on the west side of Atlanta.

Bon Appetit and GQ magazine's 2007 "Chef of the Year," David Chang is New York City's most talked-about chef at the moment with three restaurants in the East Village - Momofuku Noodle Bar, Momofuku Ssam Bar, and Momofuku Ko. As Frank Bruni (New York Times restaurant critic) put it: "David Chang is at this point the New York restaurant world’s equivalent of Tiger Woods or Roger Federer, armed with a spatula in place of a nine-iron or tennis racket. He’s marveled at and clucked over like nobody’s business. He’s it."

Notorious nearly right angle turn on Interstate 90 in the southeastern section of downtown.

Theory that the standard price for a slice of cheese pizza moves in lockstep with the price of one subway ride, though no one is 100 percent sure which change causes the other.

Rappers will sometimes call Ft. Myers "Lil Pakistan" because of its relatively high crime rate. Although Pakistan's crime rate is low compared to industrialized countries, people in the US often get the impression that Pakistan is war-torn and crime-ridden, in all places at all times.