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1. Little Havana: An area in Western Miami influenced by the culture of the city's large Cuban population.  
2. Cruise Capital of the World: A nickname for the Port of Miami, due to the brisk business of passenger cruises situated here.  
3. Gateway of the Americas, The: A nickname for Miami, in reference to the cultural and linguistic diversity of its population.  
4. SoBe: South Beach  
5. Magic City: A nickname for Miami  
6. Gateway to Latin America, The: Nickname for Miami  
7. City Under the Sun: Nickname for Miami  
8. Carnival Miami: The "Largest Party in the Hispanic Market", in February and March.  
9. Paraguero: A terrible driver.  
10. Chanx: Flip-flops. Origin: the Spanish word "chancletas", meaning sandals.  
11. Walt Disney World  
12. Epcot Center
13. Animal Kingdom®  
14. Sea World: Sea World is an aquatic adventure park with Orca, Sea Lion, and Dolphin shows, aquatic wildlife displays, roller...
15. Villas at Disney's Wilderness Lodge, The: The Villas are themed after the Resorts located in the Rocky Mountain national park geyser area. All units feature ...  
 
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Past Words of the Day

1. The Japanese cherry tree that makes the National Cherry Blossom Festival possible. The festival first started in 1934 to commemorate the mayor of Tokyo's gift of 3,000 sakuras to the city of Washington, D.C. The number of trees has since grown to over 6,000.

2. Japanese cherry tree.

Nickname for the Waffle House restaurant chain.

1. dinner

2. The word supper (pronounced suppah) is most often used in Boston for the last meal of the day. Most parts of the country say dinner. The dinner vs. supper phenomenon is actually a pretty complicated ones with regional, class, and culinary implication. Boston is nonetheless supper-dominant.

Jersey slang for tourists.

This slang for rubber bands in Pittsburgh speak, not to be confused with bubble gum bands, which are singing groups without instrumental accompaniment.