Frequently Asked Questions

What is CityDictionary.com?

City Dictionary is a reference for local language in the United States. City Dictionary Citizens can create dictionary entries to define local language for their cities. People can also benefit from their fellow Citizens’ work by learning about other cities in the US. This information sharing will promote understanding of—and appreciation for—the many ways that Americans speak.

The Citizen-generated dictionary entries are voted on by other Citizens, which tends to push the best words to the top of each city’s page, as well as push the best definitions to the top of each word page.

Why do I need to register?

When you register we can keep track of the work you've done and reward you with greater autonomy on the site.

How do I earn points?

You earn points on City Dictionary by providing useful information. You earn 1 point for adding a word or photo and 5 points for adding a definition. In addition, you receive 1 point for each positive vote for your definitions and photos.

What if my town isn't listed?

There are a number of small towns that are not currently listed on the site. If you would like to add an entry for a town or city not listed, please just let us know the city, state and the nearest larger city.

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Past Words of the Day

An adjective used to describe something that is Wisconsin-like, or a noun that simply means Wisconsinite. Wisconsinites are often called "Sconnies" outside of the state. The word is now gaining traction within Wisconsin as well, largely the result of the company "Sconnie Nation" that was founded by two UW-Madison students in their Lakeshore dorm room.

The old name for Albuquerque. The first 'r' was removed back in the 19th Century after Anglos had a hard time with the original Spanish pronunciation.

Slugging is a form of hitchhiking in DC that benefits both the hitchhiker and the driver. The driver can use the much faster HOV lane after taking on a passenger.

As used in Pittsburgh, the word means "lately" or "currently" as in "The gas prices are outrageous anymore."

Giles Corey utter these words during the Salem Witch Trials. Accused of being a warlock, Corey was arrested on April 18, 1692. At that time, a person could not be tried unless he entered a plea of "guilty" or "not guilty." When Corey refused to plea, he was tortured by the authorities, who laid a heavy board on top of him and placed large stones on the board. Every time they asked for a plea, Corey simply said, "More weight." Eventually Corey was crushed to death. Visitors to the Witch City can see Corey's grave marker, and the Witch Trials Memorial, in Salem Cemetery.